No sweat: Should my muscles be hurting days after a workout?

No sweat: Should my muscles be hurting days after a workout?


James Pop By Chris Simms So you went to the gym or for a jog yesterday and now have to crawl up the stairs, it’s agony to stand or sit, or your arms are so sore you can’t brush your teeth. Congratulations, you have #majorDOMS – a badge of honour used in the weights room to indicate that you have pumped some serious iron. But what, or who, is major Doms? And is pain a good thing when it comes to building muscle? If your muscles ache directly after exercise, it’s known as acute muscle soreness. This is thought to be caused by a combination of three things: muscle fatigue, the accumulation of acidic waste products – chiefly hydrogen ions – from the chemical reactions involved in using your muscles, and a build-up of the fluid sent to remove these waste products. The aching should ease after a bit of rest. “If you are in a lot of pain straight afterwards, it’s more likely you’ve damaged the muscle. It could be indicative of a strain, which might take more like seven days to heal,” says Laura-Anne Furlong of Loughborough University, UK. But if the muscle ache kicks in 24 to 72 hours after your bout of exercise, you have delayed onset muscle soreness – or DOMS to your Instagram followers. Your muscles contract by pegging together fibres called actin and myosin. Every time a muscle lengthens,
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